Monday, 14 April 2014

Light Heart




This week's dictionary is my dear old friend, the Heinemann English, which I received as a study aid in the year 1981. After Skeat's 1894 this seems rather modern, but Skeat has only been on my shelf for 10 years or so: Heinemann has 33 years of shared history. I can't remember when it lost the front cover. One day I will do some binding repairs, and I will keep it organic because I might take this one to my grave. And the first word it gives me is light-hearted adjective: while outside the sun is shining, the birds in full voice, the air has a feeling in it, a vibrant buzz, like someone has tapped the side of a cosmic crystal with a spoon of heavenly metal. Light-hearted has a Word Family; light-heartedly, adverb, light-heartedness, noun; such a lovely concept. Sun floods the moor tops: I have an urge to wander out to Feather Tor today, floating some floral print on a fine breeze. Back from the walk I will buy an ice cream from the little van, sit in the car with the windows wound down while a muddied Dog lolls and the crowbirds hop.
Later this day: I did go to Feather Tor, wrapped in thermals and woollen hat (to help shift an earache) and ate an ice cream whilst walking, slowly, gazing at ponies. 



4 comments:

  1. Good for you for putting to rest the nonsense 'You can't take it with you'. I laughed at your taking the 33 year old reference book to the grave. Good for you as well, for your light-heartedness in the afternoon at Feather Tor floating some floral print on the fine breeze...love that!
    Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

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  2. Especially like the pony picture. It's like they're creating a geometric gap in their line of shadows, upon which a fourth pony will appear. Something in the observer always expects magic, I guess.

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  3. I am a teensy bit blessed eh?
    If one of the children/grandchildren takes a shine to the dictionary then maybe I will go to ground without it (or into the viking funeral pyre, or weighted to the ocean floor) but that's for the future to reveal (much later, I hope!)
    Dagnabbit Geo- later there were FOUR PONIES!! Which must be how they successfully reproduce in such an exposed environment...

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